A look at Albuquerque Solid Waste’s Wildflower Project

LEGALIZED CAMPS FOR THE HOMELE.SS ALBUQUERQUE IS ONE OF 82 CITIES ACROSS THE COUNTRY RECOGNIZED AS A BEE-FRIENDLY CITY. A PROGRAM CALLED THE WILDFLOWER PROJECT IS SUPPORTING OUR LOCAL BEE POPULATION, WHILE HELPING WITH WEED CONTROL. BREANA: PRETTY COOL, RIGHT? GENEVIEVE GLASISS LIVE FOR US THIS MORNING. GENEVIEVE, YOU VISITED A FEW SITES. WHAT WERE THEY LIKE? GENEVIEVE: THEY WERE RELYAL LOVELY. IT IS SOMETHING YOU PROBABLY HAVE SEEN AROUND BUT HAVE NOT PAID MUCH NOTICE TWO. ONCE YOUO D KNOW ABOUT THEM, I’M SURE YOU WILL NOW. ALBUQUERQUE SOLID WASTE IS ON A MISSION TO PRESERVE BEES IN THE DUKE CITY AND THEY ARE DOING THAT THROUGH THESE WILDFLOWER GARDENS. WHEN WE THINK OF BEES, MANY OF US THINK OF HONEY. BUT WHAT IF I WERE TO TELL YOU BEES A RREESPONSIBLE FOR POLLINATING NEARLY A THIRD OF OUR FOOD? >> WE NEED THE FLOWERS. WE NEED ETH BEES FOR THE POLLINATION. ALL OF THOSE ARE BEE ATTRACTORS. GENEVIEVE: IN THE LAST YR,EA THEY HAVE ADDED 9 NEW SITES, TOTALING A TOTAL OF 38N I ALBUQUERQUE. THIS IS JUST OFF OF CENTRAL IN NOB HILL. YOU CAN FIND ONE LIKE THIS IN A NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR YOU. >> WITH THEOS PLANTERS, WE DECREASE THE USE OF CHEMICALS. IF I DIDN’T HAVE THIS, WE WOULD HAVE. WHEN WE VEHA WEEDS, WE USE CHEMICALS TO KL THILEM. GENEEVE:VI — >> WE HAVE MIXED WILDFLOWERS. WHEN ONE GSOE DOWN, ANOTHER ONE TAKES OVER. WE HAVE-9 8 MONTHS COLOR. GENEVIE:EV BRINGING COLOR TO OUR CITY, ALL WHILE BUILDING A STRONGER ECOSYSTEM. MO ALSO TOLD ME AT THE END OF THE SEASON, THEY HARVEST UP TO 4 MILLION SEEDS FROM THESE SITES, AND WHAT THEY DO IS THEY PLANT THOSE AT NEW LOCATIO.NS PRETTY COOL. YOU LIVE IN UPTOWN, GENEVIEVE GLASS,

A look at Albuquerque Solid Waste’s Wildflower Project

An eco-friendly way to preserve bees in the Duke City

When we think of bees, many of us think of honey — but did you know bees are responsible for pollinating nearly a third of our food? The Albuquerque Solid Waste Management Department launched the Wildflower Project as a way to support the local bee population, reduce weeds and water waste. They plant wildflower seed mixes across the city to not only beautify our neighborhoods, but also create a healthier ecosystem. “We need the flowers,” said Mo Shabaz, a landscape specialist who spearheads this project. “We need the bees for the pollination, so all those are bee attractors.”In the last year, the team has added nine new sites, making for a total of 38 in Albuquerque. “With those planters, we decrease the use of chemicals,” Shabaz said. “If we didn’t have this, we will have weeds. When we have weeds, we use chemicals to kill.”Chemicals, he says, that seep into groundwater. Using native wildflowers is also a cost-effective way to save water, as they don’t need much once they are established.”We have a mix of wildflowers,” Shabaz said. “When one goes down, the other one takes over. Then we have like eight to nine months of color.”Bringing color to our city, all while building a stronger ecosystem.

When we think of bees, many of us think of honey — but did you know bees are responsible for pollinating nearly a third of our food?

The Albuquerque Solid Waste Management Department launched the Wildflower Project as a way to support the local bee population, reduce weeds and water waste. They plant wildflower seed mixes across the city to not only beautify our neighborhoods, but also create a healthier ecosystem.

“We need the flowers,” said Mo Shabaz, a landscape specialist who spearheads this project. “We need the bees for the pollination, so all those [wildflowers] are bee attractors.”

In the last year, the team has added nine new sites, making for a total of 38 in Albuquerque.

“With those planters, we decrease the use of chemicals,” Shabaz said. “If we didn’t have this, we will have weeds. When we have weeds, we use chemicals to kill.”

Chemicals, he says, that seep into groundwater. Using native wildflowers is also a cost-effective way to save water, as they don’t need much once they are established.

“We have a mix of wildflowers,” Shabaz said. “When one goes down, the other one takes over. Then we have like eight to nine months of color.”

Bringing color to our city, all while building a stronger ecosystem.

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